Amy Vega, MS, CCC-SLP

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Did you know that listening and reading comprehension are linked?

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Did you know that listening and reading comprehension are linked? And that both skills are very much controlled by our brain’s timing system that functions like a clock? According to a study by Breier et al (2003) published in the Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research (2003), the brain must process quite a bit of time-dependent information in the speech stream in order for a person to understand what is being said (i.e., timing of voice onset, voice offset, pitch, frequency, pauses between sounds, syllables, words, phrases, etc) If the brain’s timing is off even just a little it affects how the brain perceives sounds, and this in turn affects how well a person can follow verbal directions, comprehend what is said, or read. Fortunately, we can help our brain process time more precisely with the right kind of practice and thus improve such time-dependent skills as listening and reading comprehension. Interactive Metronome (IM) is a unique, patented program that has been shown in clinical research to improve mental timing through progressive, engaging cognitive and motor exercises. Continuous, real-time feedback is provided so you will know each step of the way how you are progressing! Studies show that by improving the brain’s timing with IM, auditory processing and reading not only improve, but do so significantly and in a relatively short period of time compared to other programs like phonics instruction.

Breier, J.I., Fletcher, J.M., Foorman, B.R., Klaas, P., and Gray, L.C. (2003). Auditory Temporal Processing in Children with Specific Reading Disability With and Without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. University of Texas, Houston. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 46, 31-42. 

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Amy Vega, MS, CCC-SLP received her master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of South Florida in 1994 and holds the Certificate of Clinical Competency from the American Speech Language & Hearing Association (ASHA). In clinical practice, she specialized in adolescent and adult rehabilitation for patients diagnosed with traumatic brain injury, stroke, epilepsy, brain tumor & and other disease processes that affect communication, cognition, and behavior. She currently serves as Director of both the Clinical Education Department and the Clinical Advisory Board for Interactive Metronome, Inc. and is their Continuing Education Administrator. She provides clinical support to Interactive Metronome (IM) providers globally, serves as Editor in Chief for IM’s educational publications, develops IM certification & training materials, and is the master-trainer for IM certification instructors.

Comments

  • Lorraine Sgarlato
    Lorraine Sgarlato Wednesday, 08 February 2012

    Amy thank you for publishing this article to help parents learn more about Interactive Metronome therapy and Auditory Processing. By improving auditory processing skills you improve the brain's ability to take information in quickly and more effectively thus improving the person's overall comprehension skills, which in turn help improve reading and reading comprehension. I have also found Interactive Metronome to improve my patient's ability to link sound-to-symbol more effectively. It's incredible how "tapping to a beat" can help improve phonics but when you understand that it is improving the brain's overall timing mechanism then it makes sense!

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